Canada

The Real Economy, Canada: Fall 2021

The unintended consequences of a public health crisis

THE REAL ECONOMY  | 

Although well-intentioned, the response of policymakers to economic shocks as a result of the pandemic, combined with disruptions to the global supply chain and other threats to the global economy, could now threaten economic recovery in Canada.

Also in this issue: Canada feels the pinch from disruptions in the global supply chain, what’s next for the Liberals now that the federal election has come and gone, and what Canadian law firms can do to keep talent north of the border.

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Key takeaways from The Real Economy, Canada: Fall 2021

  • Fragile global supply chains disruptions will almost certainly delay the return of full production in the global economy until the middle of next year and create the conditions for further price volatility until the temporary roadblock that is the delta variant eases.
  • Despite not winning a majority, the Liberals will govern as if they have one in the short term.
  • More Canadian lawyers moved to the top 200 U.S. firms in the first six months of 2021 than they did in all of 2018, 2019 or 2020.
IN THIS ISSUE

Unintended consequences of a global economy

Unintended consequences of a global economy

There are hard lessons to be learned from globalization and the response of policymakers to economic shocks and health crises.

Global supply chain disruptions accelerate

Global supply chain disruptions accelerate

Global supply chains are facing another round of port closures, factory shutdowns, production halts and labour shortages.

Expect Trudeau and the Liberals to continue their activist approach

Expect Trudeau and the Liberals to continue their activist approach

The government will move to the next phase of the recovery, one that is focused on addressing the dislocations caused by the pandemic.

Canadian law firms are losing talent

Canadian law firms are losing talent

The red-hot labour market for lawyers in the United States is drawing the attention of Canadians willing to make the move.

RSM CONTRIBUTORS

Tuan Nguyen, Ph.D.

U.S. Economist, RSM US LLP

Sonya King

Director, RSM Canada


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